Gardening for Stress Relief

Posted on by Paula Gallagher

gardening

Did you know that gardening could improve mental and physical health, boost quality of life, cost next to nothing, and actually be fun, too? And the only downside... maybe a little dirt under the fingernails. (If you don't like dirty fingernails, wear gloves!) The great thing about gardening is its accessibility. Gardening in some form is available to us all. Whether it's a small planter on your patio with herbs and tomatoes or a flower garden, or both, a garden delivers on so many levels. Being out of doors in the company of plants might be just what the doctor ordered! Consider these advantages.

Being with Nature

Gardening allows you to connect with nature, allowing all of your senses to come alive. Planting a garden, no matter how big or small, allows you to slow down and experience the therapeutic effects of the great outdoors. We live in a fast-paced world where we are often rushing from place to place. In a garden, there really is no way of rushing your plants to grow. In fact, observing your garden from day to day creates attention to detail as well as deep appreciation.

Healthy Mind

Gardening can also be a fantastic time for you to connect with yourself. It can be a time of quiet reflection and letting go of your worries. Your garden or backyard space can serve as a place of refuge from the busy world. When you are not working in your garden or yard, simply relax in it by sitting in a comfortable chair or lying in a hammock.

Healthy Body

Physically digging, raking, and pruning are great for releasing tension. Not to mention, great exercise for your body, too. In addition, sunshine provides vitamin D, a very important vitamin involved in immunity and promoting a positive mood.

Healthy Food and More Savings

Growing your own food can help to reduce your financial stress by saving you money on your grocery bill. In addition, growing your own food reduces your environmental impact and can improve the health of you and your family. For children, gardens serve as a wonderful hands-on nutrition education that can increase fruit and vegetable consumption.

Photo from here, with thanks.